Breeding Budgies


Breeding budgies is a risky thing. And before breeding your budgies, you need to make sure that you at least know the basics.

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Over Populated and Badly Bred

Here in the US, there are hundreds if not thousands of unwanted or mistreated budgies. Part of this is due to over breeding. Some people will decide to try and make some quick bucks out of some budgies that they bought on the whim, and end up with disaster on their hands due to lack of knowledge. They probably didn’t know the first thing about breeding budgies, and may have end up breeding two underage, weak, and not physically capable of raising baby budgies. If the parents somehow managed to survive the egg laying, they probably still bred unhealthy and weak chicks. These chicks never managed to find a good home, and may have been bred later on to produce yet another clutch of bad and unhealthy chicks. This is how the ,any health problems of budgies appeared. Think about all the budgies with no homes before breeding too.

Commitment

Breeding budgies require lots of time, money, and commitment. When breeding, anything can happen no matter how many precautions you may take. You always are risking lives or the health of your birds. I’m going to be honest with you, a lot of times you will feel like you just can’t do it. There are so many things to look after, to take care of.
Money is also another thing to keep in mind of. You will already be spending money on things
like nest boxes or cuttlebone. And veggies will be a daily money-sucker. Make sure you are willing to spend as much money as needed, and that you have it. You never know when a emergency vet appointment will need to be scheduled.

Heart Break
There will be a lot of heartbreak when breeding budgies. The death of chicks is not something that is unheard of. You can’t expect a zero-grade mortality rate. Not only that, but there are also several risks for the parent birds. They spend 24/7 looking after their clutch, and it can be very energy consuming. If they aren’t ready and built for the commitment, they may not make it out so well. There are things that need to be carefully looked after, such as egg binding. There are a few life-threatening conditions that can become present while breeding. In total, the life of your dear pets are in your hands when you breed. If you’re willing to take the risk, continue reading ahead.

After reading all that’s been said, hopefully you will realize what goes into breeding budgies. If you still feel like you can do it, and you’re willing to fully take on all responsibilities, continue reading!

So, now you know all the risks. And you still decide that you want to breed your budgies. There are a few things you need first. And when I say need, you really must have them. If you’re missing one, then things can go wrong.

Male and Female of age

Large cage

Nestbox

Cuttlebone

Sunny cage placement

Veggies

Medical Money Available

Mineral Blocks

A toy or two

White, paper towel sheets

The Breeding Birds
When you have selected the birds you will be breeding, you need to make sure they have met all the requirements. If they haven’t, I suggest you don’t breed them. They aren’t ready.

Firstly, they need to be at least 1.5 – 2 years of age. This will ensure that they are physically ready and that their bodies are strong enough to bring up a needy clutch of chicks. They will be adults by this time, and they will have a sense of how to do so.

They also need to have a healthy background. Their life needs to have been full of veggies, toys, interaction, and lots of activity. A happy bird means a healthy bird. And they can’t have any illnesses such as the French molt, or this gene will be passed onto chicks. And no bird likes not being able to fly. They also can’t be sick. Before breeding, I’d highly suggest a vet check up. Make sure your birds are healthy and strong. If any illnesses show up, please don’t breed them until they have fully recovered.

They need to be in season. If they are, this will increase your chances of having a healthy and
successful clutch. There are a few ways to tell that a budgie is in season. In hens, the cere should a rich brown and crusty. Don’t confuse this with mites. A hen out of season will have a smooth peach cere. In males, the cere should be a bright and bold blue. It should be a brilliant blue, and have a completely smooth texture. A male out of season will have a slightly duller blue and won’t be as smooth.

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WORK IN PROCESS

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13 Comments

13 thoughts on “Breeding Budgies

  1. jasminep.

    Love it what kind of bedding,house,and where should they be put, do let the mom and dad and babies have a room to themselves

    • Thank you!
      If you are a first timer, i’d start with white paper towel bedding. This makes it easy to monitor droppings (which needs to be done daily) and when you becoe mastered at this, you can switch to non-colored newspaper. This is the cleanest. Bedding like pellets or anything else of the sort makes it hard to view droppings and can harbor several bacterial communities.
      It depends. I’d say go with the biggest cage that you can afford. Make sure it isnt domed shaped, and it has to be a rectangular or square shape. The bars can’t be big enough for them to squeeze their heads through, as this is a common death in budgies. Also, make sure the metal isnt toxic, and the paint on the bars doesnt rub off. I’d also recommend a bottom grate so that your budgies won’t be walking around in their own feces, they can get infected.
      The cage should be placed in a corner of a room that doesn’t have too much traffic, nor too little. Remember, budgies are social. Also, the cage shouldn’t be placed anywhere where dogs or cats have access to it.
      The mom and the dad should be with their babies until the babies are fully weaned. After that, they can be in a separate cage.

      Hope I helped!

  2. jasminep.

    I am a starter with budgies… Can you help me

    • Of course I can! I’m sorry for responding so late, I’ve been very busy lately. If you want, we can either talk in private, or we can talk right here. What would you need advice on? Or maybe I can try tutoring you through a process? Have you started training if you plan to? I can help you with all of these, and breeding if you’d like.

      • I need help to…………

        It would be real easy to just reply here please because I don’t always check my email cause it always crashs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Thanks Heaps!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. daddywhipp

    I love your website. The information here is very helpful!

  4. Hey, i am thinking of breeding budgies but i am only 14 years old. I really want to and have 2 budgies that will be ready to breed in November, except mum and dad aren’t really animal people. I would be really commited and all. should i go ahead if i am allowed??

    • yes u should, stop doubting yourself!!

      Taz, – abby’s sister

    • Breeding budgies certainly is a big commitment. Read ahead on breeding info, prepare, and show your parents that you are really committed. However, once the babies hatch, what will you be doing with them? Will you keep them? Will you sell them? Think about these factors.

      Also, do you have the money in preparation for if something goes wrong and vet care is needed? When you breed, you put both parent birds in risk.

      Also, breed them when you have the time. The best time (looking at the fact that you’re 14) is during the summer. This way you can monitor them without having school interfering.

  5. Hey Hey

    Very good!!!!!!!!

    I am a starter with Budgies and I don’t know whether to breed em or not????????? My parents aren’t exactly animal people but love animals!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

    What Should I Do?????????????????????????

    • What are your motives for breeding? Breeding takes time, money, and resources. Before deciding anything, read about breeding and see if you are ready for it.

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